Fox float dpx2 setup

FREE U. The DPX2 features a twin tube design that recirculates oil flow through two different pathways during compression and rebound. The DPX2 brings consistency, mid stoke support, and small bump sensitivity to the table that the Float X it replaces was lacking. Fox says that the Dual Piston system allows you to run lower pressure compared to the Float X with a monotube design, giving the shock more off the top compliance and a smooth feel.

We have high hopes for this shock, let's see how it does! There are five different Fox DPX2 volume spacers that can be used in the rear shock. Only one can be installed at a time and each are a different size allowing you to tune the spring curve characteristics. In this test, we are riding the new DPX2 shock with the largest volume spacer available navy color on a Santa Cruz Hightower.

fox float dpx2 setup

After setting sagthe largest volume spacer provided just the right amount of bottom out support to suit the Hightower. The DPX2 gave the bike's attitude a very controlled feel, allowing you to ride harder and faster down the trail. The DPX2 rewards the aggressive rider just as much as it does a novice rider. Take it out for a casual ride on some smooth trail and it will bring some playfulness to your bike. Then when you get out on some really chunky terrain, the DPX2 keeps your rear wheel planted to the ground.

Even though the shock used here in this video is not a DPX2, the same process for changing the air volume spacer can be applied. Pro GRT series.

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Home Menu Search. Continue Shopping Your Cart is Empty. Shop Watch Read. There are 10 clicks or compression adjustments used in the open setting. The compression adjustment provides a wide range of damping. So how does the DPX2 do out on the trail? This thing rips!

The DPX2 makes things easy to find that sweet spot. With some simple setup required, the DPX2 does all the hard work for you. The air volume tuning kit is certainly handy to have. Being able to fine tune the spring curve to suit both the leverage rate on your bike and your own riding preferences allows you to get the full potential out of this shock. Even though this was a short term test, if the long term reliability can be compared to other reliable products from Fox, then the DPX2 will have set the bar high for both performance and longevity.

Affiliate Program. Newsletter Signup .Dude great content and great riding! You have to be the most YouTube friendly pro rider I know Ha I don't really know you it just feels that way because of your personality Keep up the good workgood things happen to good people! Thanks for making this video. After watching a bunch of videos on how to setup my new canyon with dpx2, I realize that I'm no bike mechanic and now I wish I just got a fucking hardtail! Whe you set up the rebound does the low-speed compression position affect the rebound setup?

After setting up and on my first ride stopped after about 50m as it was like the shock was locked outchecked the LSC and it was on firm all the way. I'm getting one tomorrow from my LBS, new but from an upgraded new Bike so getting it for a good price. I have a rocky Powerplay. A completely useless explanation of how to set up the X2, where are the close up shots of each adjustment and measurement that you talk about.

Great video. Once my kids' schedules allow I'll get to try it out. I've got the sag adjusted and the rebound. Need to ride to see if I'll need to add any volume reducers. Great video! I have a dpx2 elite but do not have the 3mm LC insert?

Fox Float DPX2 Air Volume Spacer Change - How To

There is only a torx slot in middle of 3 pos blue knob, does mine not have the 3mm LC setting? Just bought a ripmo with the DPX2. Really glad you made this video. Question though. Do I even need a volume reducer? Hey mate, just want to say thanks for this video. My Transition Scout has felt numb for ages, setting up the shock as you described has worked wonders. Shred on. If you listen to Fox or watch their service vidsthey recommend you remove the shock and vice it before replacing volume spacers, but I see you simply do it while it remains on the bike.

Thats fine to do? I just bought one online in Australia. Thanks for the video. Really helpful for me as I have no clue until I saw this. Don't volume reducers or spacers, actually reduce the amount of maximum travel you have? I'm getting an upgrade DPX2 for my enduro bike from my local bike shop, with a remote lever fitted due to shock placement. I think I'll start with the largest volume space and work backwards, as I'll be around lb rider weight with gear — does it make sense for my situation to start with the largest spacer?

There are so many incredible riders out there, but damn if Jeff isn't the smoothest most fluid guy out there. He makes everything look effortless.I'm a big fan of twin tube damper shocks. Ever since I first rode a Cane Creek double barrel, they feel so different I just knew I'd never go back to the de carbon system I believe it's called.

fox float dpx2 setup

Has anyone tried both - on the same bike? The difficult bit is that I use this one bike for everything albeit with a couple of wheelsets - Alpine road trips, loads of DH bike parks, long XC rides, Enduro races and the odd DH race.

I live in the Peak District so a lot of XC. So the bike and shock have a lot of work and have to be good at pretty much everything.

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Hi Tristan! I tested both those shocks on the same bike for my review of the DPX2. Have a read and let me know if you still have any specific questions afterwards, and I'll try to answer them if I can. The real question: What bike is that shock going on? The Float X2 is a much more versatile shock, as it's designed for more abuse.

The DPX2 is the step down from the Float X2, it really was designed to fill the gap for riders like yourself. With that said, the bigger can, oil flow, and general robust built of the Float X2 is preferable in my opinion if you are doing really long descents or racing. The extra weight is negligible if you want a single shock to do everything from an after-work-ride to a stage race.

Worth noting, the DPX2 has a regressive tune, meaning it has a falling rate built into the end stroke, the idea being it is less harsh on the end stroke - it ramps like air, but is mildly more linear than a non-regressive air tune. My suggestion: get the Float X2, it's going to be fine for trail rides, and then shine and not hold you up for the big days. It's on a Nicolai G Thanks for the replies, I'll read your review fully when I get home this evening Iceman.

Mmmmm many chin strokes I'm definitely starting to feel more like the full-fat X2 is probably the one. The lack of bottom out resistance that you both mention in the DPX2 is a concern. The G16 is slightly progressive, but not massively - the DPS I currently have does whack the bottom out occasionally.

Iceman, I have 2 questions about your write up please: Firstly, what's the firm mode like on the X2? Does it still leave the shock fairly active like the medium mode on the DPX2? And secondly, please could you elaborate on the latter part of this paragraph you wrote: "The X2 is first and foremost a gravity-oriented shock, a great match for big-hitting enduro bikes but not necessarily the first choice for those looking to improve the liveliness of their ride - that is where the DPX2 really shines.

Can you explain? Some answers: "lack of bottom out support" - I wouldn't call it a lack, just that the end of the stroke is ever so slightly more "dramatic" in that you can feel the transition to the bottom out bumper a bit more markedly. There's plenty of ramp in the DPX2, and you can always throw in the biggest volume spacer for more. It's still pretty active even when you close that lever. As for liveliness, yes, the DPX2 felt a little bit more "poppy" on my test bike.

Partially because it requires a bit more pressure to play nice with bigger features, but also due to the overall smaller air volume and the tune of the damping.

Fox Float DPX2 Factory EVOL rear shock review

It's a "Trail" shock so this is to be expected.Platform View All. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 25 20 70 32 27 20 80 36 30 20 90 41 35 20 45 40 20 50 45 20 54 50 20 59 55 20 63 60 20 68 67 20 73 75 19 77 82 18 82 90 17 86 97 17 91 16 95 14 12 10 10 9 9. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 35 4 70 32 37 4 80 36 40 3 90 41 45 3 45 50 2 50 55 2 54 60 2 59 65 2 63 70 2 68 77 2 73 85 1 77 93 1 82 1 86 1 91 1 95 1 1 0 0 0 0.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 45 12 50 50 11 54 55 11 59 60 11 63 65 10 68 70 10 73 75 10 77 80 9 82 85 9 86 90 8 91 95 7 95 7 6 6 5 5 5.

fox float dpx2 setup

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 35 20 70 32 37 20 80 36 40 20 90 41 45 20 45 50 20 50 55 20 54 60 20 59 65 18 63 70 16 68 77 15 73 85 14 77 93 13 82 12 86 11 91 10 95 10 10 9 9 8 8. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 27 12 70 32 30 12 80 36 33 12 90 41 38 12 45 44 12 50 48 12 54 55 12 59 60 11 63 65 10 68 70 9 73 75 9 77 80 8 82 85 7 86 90 7 91 95 6 95 5 4 4 3 3 3.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 50 50 1 54 55 1 59 60 1 63 64 1 68 68 1 73 73 1 77 78 1 82 82 1 86 87 1 91 91 1 95 96 1 1 1 1 1. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 54 10 59 9 63 8 68 7 73 6 77 6 82 5 86 4 91 3 95 2 1 0.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 54 9 59 8 63 7 68 6 73 6 77 5 82 4 86 3 91 3 95 2 1 0. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 25 20 70 32 27 20 80 36 30 20 90 41 33 20 45 37 20 50 42 20 54 47 20 59 55 20 63 60 20 68 70 20 73 75 19 77 80 18 82 90 18 86 97 17 91 16 95 15 14 13 12 10 Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 88 40 45 8 61 65 8 66 70 8 70 74 7 76 80 7 82 85 6 87 90 6 93 96 5 98 5 4 4 3 1 2.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 54 55 13 54 59 12 59 63 11 63 67 10 71 75 9 72 76 8 76 80 7 82 85 6 86 89 5 90 93 4 94 97 3 99 2 1 0.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 54 9 59 9 63 8 68 8 73 7 77 6 82 6 86 5 91 5 95 4 3 3.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 54 13 59 12 63 11 68 10 73 9 77 7 82 6 86 5 91 4 95 3 2 1. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 45 17 50 50 16 54 55 15 59 60 15 63 65 15 68 70 14 73 75 13 77 80 13 82 85 13 86 90 12 91 95 11 95 9 8 7 7 6 6. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 14 50 13 54 12 59 11 63 10 68 10 73 9 77 8 82 7 86 6 91 5 95 5 4 3.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 76 34 45 13 61 65 13 66 70 12 70 74 11 76 80 10 82 85 9 87 90 8 93 96 7 98 6 5 4 3 1 2. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 45 13 50 50 12 54 55 11 59 60 10 63 65 9 68 70 9 73 75 8 77 80 8 82 85 8 86 90 7 91 95 7 95 6 4 4 3 3 3.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 35 17 70 32 35 17 80 36 35 17 90 41 35 17 45 35 17 50 40 16 54 45 15 59 50 15 63 55 15 68 60 14 73 65 13 77 70 13 82 75 13 86 80 12 91 85 11 95 90 9 95 8 7 7 6 6. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 88 40 45 13 61 65 13 66 70 12 70 74 11 76 80 10 82 85 9 87 90 8 93 96 7 98 6 5 4 3 1 2. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 81 16 50 89 15 54 97 14 59 13 63 11 68 10 73 9 77 8 82 7 86 6 91 5 95 4 3 2.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 55 14 70 32 57 14 80 36 59 14 90 41 62 14 45 64 14 50 67 14 54 70 14 59 80 14 63 90 14 68 98 13 73 12 77 11 82 10 86 9 91 8 95 6 5 4 3 1. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 70 11 50 80 11 54 89 10 59 99 10 63 9 68 8 73 8 77 7 82 7 86 6 91 5 95 5 4 4.

Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 45 62 8 50 71 8 54 80 7 59 89 7 63 98 6 68 6 73 5 77 5 82 4 86 4 91 3 95 3 2 2. Rider Weight Air Pressure Rebound Pounds Shorthand Kilograms Shorthand PSI Shorthand Clicks from closed 60 27 35 5 70 32 37 5 80 36 40 5 90 41 45 5 45 50 5 50 55 5 54 60 5 59 65 5 63 70 5 68 77 5 73 85 4 77 93 4 82 3 86 2 91 2 95 1 1 1 1 1 1.

Read Cookie Policy. This website uses cookies for analytics, personalization, and advertising. Please review our cookie policy to learn more or to change your cookie settings.A fitting combination of bike and shock, or maybe too much shock for the bike, but either way - why not. We strive for endless traction, we strive for endless efficiency and endless performance but in reality, we have to settle for the happy medium.

The DPX2 is exactly that, it fits the mold for the mm trail bike that demands sensitivity as well as efficiency. The DPX2 has 3 modes of high-speed compression dampening offering 3 modes of 'open, medium and firm'. That being said, the DPX2's 'firm' mode is not as firm or as solid as the DPS, but it is very efficient and as efficient as it really needs to be for the sort of application it is designed to suit.

The medium mode is essentially the one setting we felt little need for time in, but that's more of a personal thing, not a reflection on the shock's performance in that mode. The open mode is where we really felt that the shock was impressive - as it should be. Starting off like most first rides on a new shock, we wound out our low-speed compression LSC dial to it's lightest, or 'fully open' setting by turning it counterclockwise to it's stop out of 11 clicks.

The ride: The interesting thing with the DPX2 is the simplicity in setup. The adjustments are easy to use, obvious in the difference they make and not overly complicated. Whilst that's not what we necessary always look for in a shock, it was a very fitting and almost instant match made in heaven in it's new home on the Yeti SB45 think similar applications such as Santa Cruz Hightower, Trek Fuel EX, Rocky Mountain Instinct etc.

And that's the single reason why we carry suspension around in the first place - Traction. It's not there to look pretty ok sometimes it isit's there to perform and traction is its purpose. Much of this added feel of the wheel being glued to the ground is a combination of the EVOL air can's sensitivity, and the compression pistons wide openings allowing the updated 5wt fluid to move more freely through the revised piston's circuit.

As with any shock with the external reservoir, additional volume of oil and air allows for a more consistent ride over the longer runs and more demanding rides. This was certainly apparent and at not one point did we feel that the DPX2's performance was deteriorating during it's first few months on board the Yeti. In fact, after 3 months of a mixed bag of riding endeavors, by several riders of varying weights, the DPX2 showed zero signs of deteriorating performance - which is a good thing.

The range of rebound adjustment for me 72kg was massive, too much in fact but again - not a bad thing. It has a suitable range of adjustment to control the spring rate whether you're running or psi. It provided enough support towards the end of the stroke and at not once was there any harsh bottom out's felt.Jun 13, You must login to Pinkbike. Don't have an account? Sign up.

Like the X2, it uses a twin-tube damper configuration, with independent rebound and compression adjustments. The DPX2 will take over the position currently occupied by the Float X, a shock that's been in Fox's lineup since There are three compression positions, with 10 clicks of fine tuning for the full open setting.

Look at that - a rebound knob that you don't need a toothpick to adjust. Along with a smaller piggyback for improved water bottle clearance, the amount of room around the shock's eyelet was also increased to help prevent any frame fit issues. There are a variety of volume spacers available to adjust the DPX2's end stroke ramp up. Rasterman Jun 13, at So with a name like DPX2 I would expect 4 shafts I see that Fox has adopted Cove Bikes' naming convention.

Metric shox, but the variety of volume spacers are in imperial! AlexS1 Jun 13, at WaterBear Jun 13, at MTBrent Jun 13, at Powderface Jun 13, at Should have called it the DVDA. Powderface : I don't wanna sound like a queer, but Ron-C Jun 13, at The performance elite will have a black shaft with a kashima body for some reason. High-Life Jun 13, at If you have to ask what it means you can't afford it. High-Life : "what's a ZJ? Boardlife69 Jun 13, at With 4 shafts I bet those seals wear out really quick making it feel all sloppy, mushy and loose.

Review: DPX2, the New Trail Shock From Fox

They'll never know the potential of hamster style.Highly adjustable option for mid-travel trail bikes. By Seb Stott. That means it cycles damping oil through concentric tubes, rather than moving it back and forth by the displacement of the damper shaft. In theory, this should help keep the damping more consistent. The level of damping applied in open mode can be fine-tuned with a 3mm Allen key.

I settled on leaving it nearly fully open, which gave superb off-the-top sensitivity. This gave better small-bump tracking without the bike feeling too lively after bigger hits. If your bike comes with a DPX2, it should hopefully have the appropriate tune already. Seb's been riding and racing mountain bikes for half his life.

Since getting hooked on mountain bikes aged thirteen riding a tiny 24Seven Crosser, he's raced downhill, enduro and cross country, and while no athlete, still enters the occasional race. Seb studied experimental physics at university, and he's now happily using wasting his degree experimenting with different bike setups, trying to work out what works best and why. You'll often find him riding the same track ten times in a day, changing just one thing to pin down the differences.

Seb's much happier back-to-back testing suspension on a wet Welsh hillside than riding the latest five-figure bikes on some sunny press trip - although he quite likes that too! Our rating. November 26, at am.

Latest deals. Our review Potentially highly sensitive, but needs the right tune Buy if, You want hight levels of adjustability.

Pros: Potentially highly sensitive terrain tracking, useful amount of adjustment, firm lockout option as well as intermediate climbing setting. Skip to view product specifications. Seb Stott Technical Writer. Daily Deals. Subscribe Now. Do 0mm stems have a place on drop bar bikes?